Scientist Predicts Humans Can Upload Deceased Family, Friends To Their Computers By The End Of The Year

Scientist Predicts Humans Can Upload Deceased Family, Friends To Their Computers By The End Of The Year

“Start keeping regular records of your parents, elders and loved ones,” says the doctor. Prateik Desai, founder of several AI platforms, in a Twitter thread Sunday. “With enough transcription data, new speech synthesis and video models, there is a 100% chance they will stay with you forever after leaving the physical body. It should also be possible later this year."

Experts who spoke to Fox News Digital had mixed reactions to Dr. Desai, with some questioning the moral and philosophical factors involved in creating the tool, while others downplayed the development's potential.

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Software engineer and author Drew Romero agrees with Mendoza's point of view, saying that making digital copies of people who have died has serious ethical, legal, and social implications to consider, such as privacy, consent, authenticity, and cultural norms.

He added that Desai's claims were "highly speculative" and "not supported by current technology and research."

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"Literally, if I die — and I collect this data — people can come or my child, they can come and talk to my avatar, my movements, my voice," Sychev told VICE. “You will meet someone. And maybe, for the first 10 minutes of conversation with this person, you won't know that it's actually HE. That's the point."

Meanwhile, South Korean AI video production company DeepBrain has created a program called Memory, a virtual human service that uses AI to recreate deceased clients' family members, "simulating every aspect of them, from their physique to their voice." .

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In 2019, California-based company HereAfter AI created the first app that lets family and friends save "memories" of your life and interact with a virtual version of you.

The emerging business idea has been compared to an episode of the British science fiction anthology series Black Mirror entitled "Be Right Back". The episode tells the story of Martha, a young Irish woman whose boyfriend is killed in a car accident. To deal with her grief, Martha reluctantly contacts a company that allows her to communicate with an artificial intelligence imitating her lost love.

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Politicians, lawmakers and actors have repeatedly raised concerns about deep spoofing technology, a process in which deep learning artificial intelligence is used to alter, substitute or mimic a person's face or voice for distribution in digital media.

In 2022, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released documents highlighting "evolving deep identity threats" to national security, including examples of fake videos featuring former President Obama, Meta's Mark Zuckerberg, podcaster Joe Rogan, actor Tom Cruise, and many more D. . . . Many of these videos have been viewed millions of times each.

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